The Bat and The Weasels

Kings, Wolves, Princesses and Lions: Traditional and Original Stories

Kings, Wolves, Princesses and Lions: Traditional and Original Stories

Kings, Wolves, Princesses and Lions: Traditional and Original Stories

The Bat and The Weasels

from “Kings, Wolves, Princesses and Lions: The Bed Time Story Book Volume Two”

This piece is based on an Aesop’s fable. Aesop’s Fables are some of the oldest recorded stories. African in origin, they are universal in appeal. They’re also very very short and incredibly moralistic, so I’ve taken the liberty of lengthening them, and adding a bit of humor. Kids love slapstick. Have fun with the sound effects.

by Mark Binder, Copyright 2012. All Rights Reserved.

Once there lived a bat, who squeaked and flew about every night with a great flutter and cry. The bat loved to eat flies and buzz low over the fields of farmers, feeling the silk of tall-growing corn whisper up against his belly.

As the night grew late and dawn approached, the bat was very careful to fly back to its home. It lived in a cave with many other bats. From daybreak until sunset hung he upside down from the ceiling, sleeping soundly.

Then, as night fell, the bat and all his brothers and sisters would fly out from their cave with a great whooshing of wings. So huge was the swarm that it looked like a storm cloud flying into the night air. Then, with sharp squeaks the bats would spin and turn about, each flying in separate directions to search for a night’s meal.

One night, the bat was especially hungry, and he flew quickly over the cornfield in search of mosquitoes or gnats. He especially liked gnats, which he ate like popcorn.

Now, bats are not blind as some might think, but their vision is not as strong as that of the falcon or owl. Instead, they rely on a form of radar, seeing in the dark by squeaking out sounds, and listening to the returning echo with their large furry ears.

This evening the bat was so hungry, and in such a great hurry that he forgot to squeak quite as frequently as usual.

And SMACK! He flew right into the big old scarecrow.

So stunned and surprised was the bat that he fell to the ground with a great thump.

In that very instant, a weasel, who had been wandering through the corn looking for baby birds, pounced on the bat.

“Let me go! Let me go!” the bat pleaded.

“And why should I?” said the weasel, its bright eyes shining red in the moonlight. “I am a weasel, the natural enemy of all birds. I think I’m going to eat you for my dinner.”

“Wait, wait,” said the bat. “I am not a bird”

“Not a bird?” frowned the weasel. “But you have wings.”

“These?” said the bat, trying to hide his leathery wings, “They are nothing. Have you ever seen a bird like me?”

The weasel admitted that he hadn’t. “What are you then?” he asked.

“I am a rat,” said the bat.

“A rat?” the weasel shuddered. “I could never eat a rat. I tried one once, and it tasted awful. Ahh well, you may go.”

“Thank you, kind weasel,” said the bat, and away he flew.

By now, the bat was very hungry, and more than a little shaken up. He flew away from the cornfield, and headed toward the cherry orchard where he hoped to find a grasshopper or a beetle.

Once again, he flew fast and low, and once again he forgot to squeak quite as frequently as usual.

SMACK! He flew right into a low branch of a cherry tree, and fell to the ground with a great thump.

The next moment, another weasel, who had been wandering through the orchard looking for rats for dinner, pounced on the bat.

“Let me go! Let me go!” the bat pleaded.

“And why should I?” said the weasel, its bright eyes shining red in the moonlight. “I am a weasel, the natural enemy of all rats. I think I’m going to eat you for my dinner.”

“Rats?” said the bat. “Wait, wait. I am not a rat”

“Not a rat?” frowned the weasel. “But you have fur and a nose like a rat.”

“These?” said the bat, “They are nothing. Have you ever seen a rat with wings?”

The weasel admitted that he hadn’t. “What are you then?” he asked.

“I am a bird,” said the bat.

“A bird?” the weasel shuddered. “I could never eat a bird. I tried one once, and it tasted awful. Ahh well, you may go.”

“Thank you, kind weasel,” said the bat, and away he flew safe once again.

The moral of the story? Take advantage of your situation, and listen before you speak.

—————-

Copyright 2012 by Mark Binder
All Rights Reserved

From, The Bed Time Story Book, Volume 2, provisionally titled, “Kings, Wolves, Princesses and Lions.”

More than 30 new (and old) stories to share. Designed for parents to read to and with their children, for children (K-2) to read for themselves, and for older siblings to share with the younger ones. The Bed Time Story Book series has sold more than 60,000 copies in print and ebook form.

You can learn more and order copies at by clicking here

– In the meantime, you can find the original “Bed Time Story Book” in
… softcover and kindle: http://bit.ly/ibook_bedtime
… nook: http://bit.ly/bedtime_nook
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